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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
it. featured speakers include simon johnson, former chief economist with the imf, and karen petrou. this is just over an hour: >> thank you very much. i certainly hope and expect that this discussion will be as stimulating and exciting as the last panel. each of the panelists will speak for about ten minutes, and then we'll have an opportunity for colloquy among the panelists and then open for questions to the audience. we'll go in the following order, scheherazade will start us off, then anna will be second, simon third and karen fourth. so, scheherazade, please, kick us off. >> thank you. thank you, art. it's a pleasure to be here at she leaf's annual event. i will try not to put you too much into a gloomy mood. [laughter] if you're going to discuss the business of trying to predict what possibly is the next financial crisis, i think it's important to discuss the changing nature of these crises. thirty years ago we had what we now affectionately call the traditional type of crisis, only happened in emerging markets, and the contagion of this crisis was regional. so if brazil got
the following order. ann pinedo will be second, simon third, and karen forth. please kick us off. >> thank you. it's an honor to be here. ly not fry to put you in a glomy mood. it you're going to discuss the business of trying to predict the next financial crisis, i think it's important to discuss the changing nature of these cry cease. thirty years ago we have what we call the traditional type of crisis only happen in emerging market, and the contain was regional. latin america got hit. your financial eggs in southeast asia were relatively safe. in late 1995, 1994 early 1995, the world as we knew it changed. mexico crashed and something strange happened within three days market in how long hong kong, india and poll land crashed. we didn't expect it. we didn't understand what what was in place that was causing world emerging markets to crash because mexico crashed. when economist can't understand something, we give it an special name. we call it an anomaly. [laughter] when asia crashed we truly understand that something was different because it drags down every emerging market in the world. an
an open questions to the audience. we'll go to the following order. sherazad and simon third and karen fourth. so kick us off. >> thank you. thank you, art. it is a pleasure to be here at cleaf's annual event. i will not hope not to put you too much into a gloomy mood. if you're trying to predict what is the next financial crisis, i think it is important to discuss the changing nature of these crises. 30 years ago, we had what we gnaw affection atly call the traditional type of crisis. only happens in emerging markets and contagion of these crisis was regional. so if brazil got hit, latin america got hit. effects in southeast asia were relatively safe. but in late 1995, sorry, 1994, early 1995, the world as we knew it changed. mexico crashed and something very strange happened. within three days markets in hong kong, india, hungary, poland crashed. we weren't expecting this and we most certainly did not understand what transmission mechanism was in place that was causing world emerging markets to crash just because americas cocrashed. you know when economists can't understand something
of the luxury of time and my publisher, simon & schuster, i declined to get the meeting notes to get the exact detail to interview president obama and speaker boehner and the key players in this. i just want to take one quick snapshot from what happened that we didn't know about, which is critical. when the cops pull up less when the president was upset, he called the congressional leaders on a saturday morning at 11:00 o'clock a.m. the democratic and republican leaders were trying to work out their own deal. harry reid, the democratic leader, said to the president, mr. president, could you please leave the room? i have covered presidents for four years. i know of no other time where the president was asked the meeting in his own house that he had called. i asked the president about this. i said how did it feel to be voted off the island in your own house. because that is what happened. he said that he was not going to stand on protocol, that the problem needed to be solved. but in the next day, he called democratic leaders to the white house from 6:00 o'clock on a sunday night. and harry reid
between us" a memoir, a simon & schuster title and and you are watching booktv on c-span two. up next deanne stillman reports on the largest manhunt in cover history after -- this is just over an hour. [applause] >> that was a really nice introduction and i want to say a big thank you to debbie, debbie kross and trudy mills and you all have been such great supporters of my work and the literary community. it's really nice and also think you to c-span for continuing to support my work as well. i love booktv and in the program may teach at uc riverside in palm desert i recommend highly to my students that they watch the tv every weekend. also i would like to thank all of you for coming out tonight. it means a lot to me and it's a beautiful evening, a full moon evening and it's hot out. not unlike the weather that wasn't played on -- when they incident i write about in my new book "desert reckoning" takes place. i want to tell you a bit about how and why i came to write this book. it was august 2, 2003 and as some of you know the mohave is my long-time beat longtime beach and i was visit
and management simon johnson. that'll be coming up in about 15 minutes, 15, 20 minutes or so. we'll have it live here on c-span2. the day started with securities and exchange commission chairman mary schapiro who addressed the group on a number of issues including full implementation of the dodd-frank law, executive pay and the sec's annual budget. >> good morning, everyone. thank you very much for that kind introduction, and, in fact, for your wonderful stewardship and leadership of my alma mater. and it's always wonderful to be back at gw. i also want to thank the university for hosting the financial regulatory reform symposium. i think it's an important opportunity to contribute to the debate and the discussion around financial regulatory reform. four years ago this month this nation was suffering from a near collapse of our financial system. while there are differences of opinion as to what was the most significant trigger, a bipartisan senate committee report known as the levin-coburn report asserted that the crisis was the result of, quote, high risk, complex financial products, undisclose
a pleasure to be here. the stewardship of the simon center for american studies here has been stellar, and its heritage now speaks out on a variety of philosophical as well as practical questions of the day in a way that has changed the conversation in washington. it is also always an honor for me to be here in the house that had built to at fuller, one of the great figures of modern conservatism, and he really build this place. he did build it. from nothing into the a great empire that it is today. and i also would send greetings to the other end who is certainly one of the most effective attorney-general said to my attorneys general i should say of the united states and many, many years and two courageously launched the whole movement for original lesson in constitutional object. well, i am here to say something about the argument of this book which is, you can have heard, call i am the change. and the title is meant to bring out president obama's louis the 14 side. louis the 14 supposedly said, i am the state. mr. obamacare very close in a press conference to say i am the change. t
was reyna grande whose memoir is called "the distance between us" a memoir, published by sean -- simon & schuster. reyna grande tell us your life story. >> my life story? you mean the kerosene story? >> when you went to school and they did a sanitation check on you. >> oh, okay. yeah, when i came to -- in fifth grade one day than there showed up and the teacher said she is coming to inspect all the kids for lice. i was so shocked because i couldn't understand that happened in mexico because all of his head lice. we were all poor kids coming to school barefoot and dirty and we all head lice but in l.a. i didn't expect there to be lice and for a second there i thought maybe they cross the border illegally like i had. i got inspected and it turned out that i had lice. i was so afraid to go home and tell that to my dad because i didn't want him to think that i was still that dirty little girl he had left mine in mexico. i thought he was going to beat me as well because that was his favorite way of disciplining us. it turned out that my father was not angry at me and he didn't blame me and
is called "the distance between us: a memoir," published by simon & schuster. reyna grande, tell us the life story. >> guest: the life story? demand the kerosene story? >> host: the story when you were to school and they did a sanitation check on you. >> guest: okay, when i came to elementary and fifth-grade, one day the nurse showed up in the teacher said she's come to inspect all the kids for lace. and i was so shocked because i couldn't understand is that it happened in mexico because all of us had lace. we were all poor kids coming to school barefoot and dirty and we all had lice. but in l.a. i just didn't expect it to be lice. for a while i thought i had crossed the border illegally like i had. i got inspect it and it turned out that i had lice and i was so afraid to go home and tell that to my dad because i didn't want him to think that i was still the dirty little girl he had left behind in mexico. and i thought he was going to beat me as well because that was his favorite way of disciplining us. and it turned out that my father was not angry at me and he didn't blame me and he didn't
know the next time this thing happens it happens for real, like simon said it's been reiterated, is going to be much worse. sorry. >> and. >> first topic that the papers put together a really wonderful and comprehensiveness and clarity and am really highlighting that there are so many unintended consequences and so many crosswinds come even within the rules that have been adopted in those that are yet to be finalized, that it does create a great deal of complexity risk, even if one accountable board wants to do the right thing. at this point can we find there so many boards struggling and spending so much time simply trying to understand the interplay of the rule. and lastly, on the operational difficulties, were introducing quite a number of new entries if you will into the system through dodd-frank, whether it's the clearing -- the central claim, and i think were all sort of understating the complexity that's involved in handling all of these and then being prepared to sort of flip the switch, even if it's phasing to do away for real great confidence in. >> simon. >> through s
brian bilbray for challenger simon scott peters. we'll be right back. >> moderator: welcome back to good uttv debate between brian bilbray and challenger. i want to give the floor to you talking about medicare and how to fix it. bilbray: first a rebuttal. "the wall street journal" said they supported the right thing but in medicare as we know it. it wasn't some left-winger that said that. the other thing is they've got me on tape twice saying i wanted to and medicare. he cut my answer off for once and does i'd wondered if he'd release the whole answer that i gave an order that the public might have proposal. peters: you've been quoted as saying that medicare needs to be cut to sustain it. and that you're suggesting, how exactly do you do that? bilbray: you have to get the benefits. you have to cut the cost. we don't negotiate the cost of prescription to do that. to use the leverage to negotiate a price. we also know there's a lot of overbilling we need to take care of. and that's it in a very clear throughout this campaign. >> moderator: i want to get back to divine plan. there's been ma
for them. >> host: and we have been talking with reyna grande, "the distance between us: a memoir," a simon & schuster title. you are watching booktv on c-span 2. >> joseph wheelan recounts the life of general sure didn't who forced the surrender of robert e. lee at appomattox courthouse. the author recalls general sure didn't postwar career, which included command of the u.s. army. it's about 45 minutes. >> i want to thank quiller ridge books for inviting me back and all of you people for coming out to hear about general bill sheridan, who out of the triumvirate of union generals credited with winning civil war companies probably the least known of them. the others being ulysses s. grant and william tecumseh sherman. 1937, the three generals appear together in a commemorative postage stamp. as part of a series with great u.s. military commanders. and to his right is sherman and sheridan is on grants left. this is appropriate because by the time the civil war ended, sheraton was sometimes referred to as the left hand of grant of the left-handed. he was 10 years younger than grant and sherma
you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current administration's policies living up to libya and since. i want to say thank you for being a champion of liberty and freedom. thank you. [applause] it is great restoration weekend and if you have not been, please get the tablet out there and we will go last year and we screened our film and we are able to be there and it is phenomenal. an opportunity for liberty lovers to share the most amazing mines, declaring a call and this year we will all be celebrating together and raising a glass post-election. i want to see you guys there. be sure to join us. last year we had a wonderful opportunity of hearing ann coul
for the various rovers have included "love me like a rock," paul simon. come fly with me, wake up little susie, the simon and garfunkel version. radar love, the theme from mission impossible and, probably my favorite, where is my mind by the pixies. [laughter] so the burning question is, who gets to pick the songs? >> actually, you know, i was only tangentially aware of that, and i recognize it from your telling it. i really don't know. so it sounds like a great talk for somebody -- [laughter] probably i would say it's jpl, within their team probably. >> okay. and we can tell from their dress code they're a wild bunch, so that explains a lot of the songs. the last question i know you are an expert in, and that is your own trajectory into coming into planetary science and enjoying it and living with it. and i can see you're still enthusiastic about it. what have been the high points and the low points for you in the world of science, and what keeps you enthusiastic about it? >> well, the whole -- my whole time at nasa which is now almost 15 years is a high point in my career. so bringing -- i'm
in washington dc. this is about an hour and 25 minutes. >> welcome, everybody. i am simon, and i am the president of the mdm ndn. we are going to have a wonky discussion today. but we are very lucky to have rob shapiro, our good friend edward luce, who is now chief american published author about his time in india and has recently written one of the more influential or at least highly commentated -- we just feel very lucky that he took time out of his busy schedule. he is in colorado covering the election. many of you know rob shaprio has a long history of leadership here in washington. helping advise bill clinton in 1992 and eventually becoming the undersecretary of commerce for economic affairs in the second clinton term. bob and i -- we have been brought together. it is a subject we are going to talk about today. it is back in early 2005 when ndn was reborn as a think tank from being more of a political organization. i started calling people and visiting people and having lunch with people and try to figure out what was happening in the american economy. it was data that i just c
simon. this award has always been a major national book price with a hosted outstanding previous winners including among so many others, langston hughes, zora neale hurston and even the reverend dr. martin luther king jr.. and now thanks to the vision, commitment and shared energy of one person, we now have a hot web site and live streaming video of our event, national press coverage and several cavorting lectures and presentations and you know who that one person is. she is the lifeblood of the anisfeld-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade mary louise khan. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an important event on cleveland social and intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people including ron of course but also cindy schultz. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up for cindy. [applause] as married with louise put it to me just yesterday and i quote the e-mail making sure i was going to be here, the e-mail -- called me when i was on
oates, psychologist steven pinker, my colleague. a historian, simon schama. this has always been a major national book prize with a host of us any previous winners, including among so many others, links to use, zora neale hurston, and the reverend or the king junior. and now, thanks to the vision, committed in sheer energy of one person, we now have a hot website and live streaming video of our event, national press club in several supporting lectures and presentations. you all know that one person is the lifeblood of the anisfield-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade, mary louise hunt. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an event in cleveland social intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people to pull off, including ron of course, but also sandy shoals. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up to cindy. [applause] as mary louise put it to me just yesterday, and i quote an e-mail, making sure it's going to be here, she e-mailed me thr
to colonel joseph. and that's it. other to thank aei, kenneth green, our mascot at uw. john m. simon kenneth green has been instrumental in getting me here. one final slide. in this book, we talked mostly about barack obama here. rush is one chapter piercy imagine how much information they packed into this the paper talk about organic food, genetically modified food in the future could come environmentalism, solar power, vaccines, european science, gender research, science journalism, false equivalence, wore an excellent and important issues for 2012 and beyond. that said, that's all i have. thank you very much. [applause] >> by the book. it's worth the investment of me. i have a bunch of questions, but i'm going to go to the floor after only asking one of them. could you talk a little bit about how natural gas went from being clean burning natural gas in the environmental movement to the point where we now have a war on natural gas from the mainstream? >> that's a great question. john and sign has a great answer to this. natural gas is to be a turning of the environment must the environment
to embrace the difference of character. i came to texas. we have realized that there is simon amazing aspect incredible diversity i finally learned to become the resident, i'm happy one of the reasons i'm learning to represent you guys. >> moderator: each candidate is going to have a two-minute statement and we start with mr. tierney. tierney: first one to think the jewish panel as well as my opponents on the debate tonight. i think that we have seen this election comes down to the similar traits. on the one side has accepted freely from the tea party who said he supports the republican majority in congress across the two-party and the republican budget in the agenda and if you read the tea party has done right and has the right idea if you like what you've been seeing coming over washington with the republicans in charge and with their plans to end medicare's your nt benefits to restrict access to birth control and raise taxes on the middle class in order to pay the cuts to the millionaires do you think mr. romney and mr. tisei are right the government, seniors and working women with young
whole paper is the personality to simon baron cohen. he is a whole bunch of items that i will give you a score on what is called systemizing which is the drive to understand the variables of the system and how those variables govern the behavior so if you like to understand subway maps, spreadsheets, any sort of -- chess, any sort of complex system if you enjoy doing that you you are high on systemizing and emphasizing is the drive to identify they emotions that another person as experience and respond with an appropriate emotion. so there's a big difference here. men are generally higher on systemizing and women are higher on empathizing and what we find is that libertarians are in a sense the most masculine out there and if you evenly analyze only the men, he just look at the man, libertarian men are the highest on systemizing of any of the three groups in the lowest on empathizing. the same thing for women. in fact libertarians are only group whose systemizing scores in absolute terms, systemizing scores are higher than their empathizing scores. and this reflects a lot of what is ha
of arizona horizon. i am ted simons and that is it for now. have a great evening. >> i've made mistakes in my personal finances. i'm not perfect that i made those mistakes and i fixed them. the fact is that everybody has looked into these allegations that linda mcmahon has made an ace campaign has said it's completely false. from the danbury news-times every independent financial expert and what makes a lot of these attack ads that we have seen from linda met van especially troubling is the fact that during the exact same time, linda mcmahon still had not paid back the $1 million that she owed her creditors from bankruptcy 36 years ago. >> congressman murphy i agree that we need to talk about the issues in the state and you know an occasional financial slip is not what we are talking about here. you absolutely need to be honest with the people of connecticut. you need to be honest about your special interest loan. you need to be honest about your -- in washington. those are issues that are important to the folks of connecticut because they want to know, can they trust the congressman that the
you very much. sinemet for joining us in a special edition of arizona horizon. i'm ted simons. as for now, you have a great evening. >> i've made mistakes in my personal finances. i'm not perfect, but i made this and fix them. the fact is that everybody sues looking into these allegations have said that they are completely false. everyone from the connecticut post and the danbury news times, ever independent financial expert. and what makes a lot of these attack ads that we've seen from linda mcmahon especially troubling is the fact that during the exact same time, linda mcmahon still hadn't paid back the $1 million to creditors during bankruptcy 36 years ago. >> congressman murphy, i agree with you to talk about issues in the state. an occasional financial but this novel were talking about here. but you absolutely need to be honest with the people of connecticut. you need to be honest about your special interest loans. you need to be honest about your tenants in washington. those are issues important to the folks of connecticut because they want to know, can i trust the congr
drives the gym to get. many catholic groups are most notable in networks led by sister simone and the nuns on the bus have been vocal critics of the ryan budget which would cut spending of social services. republicans have been heavily influenced by the tea party movement in the past three years, and the tea party espouses of course that government should be far less responsible for providing the service. they believe that when the government provides social welfare it creates a culture of dependency among americans but i was struck that paul ryan use those words talk about welfare reform. so the american values survey asked americans whether they were more likely to agree that government policy and helping the poor served as a critical safety net or whether they create a culture of dependency where people are provided with too many handouts. so figure nine shows the percentage of americans were more likely to say that those policies create a culture of dependency. it's relatively few, only 32% of americans say social welfare policies create a culture of dependency. there is a
and thank you for joining us tonight on this special edition of arizona horizon. i'm ted simons and that is it for now. >> new jersey senator bob menendez and republican challenger joe kyrillos recently took part in their third and final debate. "the cook political report" listed this race as the likely democratic. courtesy of w. iptv in trenton, this is an hour. >> hello, i am jim gardner from six abc action news and we are here at the debbie tbi charden bureau with new jersey senate candidate, republican joe kyrillos and democrats robert menendez. our panelist with us today are univision reporter mariela salgado and matt friedman from the star-ledger. moderating with me, wabc anchors diana williams. we have a few simple rules to share with you before we get started. the format today will include questions of the candidates from me, diana and her to panelist. we will be around when the candidates will be able to question each other and there will be answers. >> moderator: the order was determined by a coin toss a short time ago and for fairness they will be time limits on the r
accounting for some of the funding differential that simon of lightly references at the same time they are playing a morally without the safety net that would save them meaning that market shock in the case of either operational, sovereignty or liquidity risk of a large institution would be worse. it would be lanham brothers on steroids. that's what scares me and why we need to go back to the liquidation of authority. could work in across borders attritions? does anything work in a cross border situation? not well to read about 80% of all banks offshore assets are held in the u.k. and that is particularly true for the wholesale oriented institutions like jpmorgan. they are operating in 70 countries but to what they've got in bulgaria is not systemic. maybe in bulgaria is. that is a different question. to chase and the u.k. it isn't. those are afterthought operations. that's why the u.s. and the u.k. are very fall along and what they called a crisis management group to resolve that aspect of cross border banking. is it done? no peery dividing durkan and i can answer your questions
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)